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Atheists and “Evidence”

Atheists and “Evidence”

Mike Gene got me thinking about atheists and evidence with a post today at Shadow to Light. (If you’re not following his blog, you really ought to be.) I comment there with the following thoughts, which I think are worth sharing more publicly. His post provides some necessary context, although if you’ve been involved in some of these conversations before you’ll be able to pick this up right from here.   Atheists frequently say “evidence” when they mean “proof.” For…

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What Is Faith? (Facebook Video)

What Is Faith? (Facebook Video)

The latest in my “Contentious Questions (Because some questions just are that way)” series with The Stream. Christianity is all about faith in Christ, right? But what is faith, anyway? The definition is more controversial than you might have thought. This talk is based on an article at The Stream. Image Credit(s): Patrick Fore, Unsplash.

Atheists’ Lack of Listening: Is It Arrogance or Defensiveness?

Atheists’ Lack of Listening: Is It Arrogance or Defensiveness?

It’s not just that they’re wrong. It’s that they’re so sure of themselves. I wonder if they think they’re so much smarter, they don’t even need to read what we write. It’s the arrogance, in other words. Or maybe something else, like defensiveness perhaps. It isn’t every atheist, certainly, but it’s pretty common. Last week, for example, Luis Granados wrote at The Humanist about William Lane Craig, His signature argument, borrowed from Thomas Aquinas, is that the universe must have a…

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What Bob Seidensticker Got Wrong About My “Too Good To Be False” Argument

What Bob Seidensticker Got Wrong About My “Too Good To Be False” Argument

A few weeks ago Bob Seidensticker, atheist blogger at Patheos.com, attempted to deconstruct my argument that Jesus is too good to be false. Unfortunately he got the argument wrong, so of course his refutations, such as they are, are irrelevant. Why do atheists think it’s interesting to rebut arguments Christians aren’t making? Still I want to answer him, because somebody might think he’d dealt some kind of blow to my argument, not knowing he’d actually missed the whole thing by…

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Okay, You’re Right: There’s No Evidence For Faith (Original Thinking Series)

Okay, You’re Right: There’s No Evidence For Faith (Original Thinking Series)

Republished from January 29, 2014.  Part of the extended series Evidence for the Faith I thought I was about to launch into a series on evidence for the Christian faith. Recent discussion here tells me there’s one more preliminary step to take first, however. I haven’t yet defined just what it is I’m about to provide evidence for. You see, there’s one sense in which the New Atheists are right: there’s no evidence for faith. Except they’re only right to…

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“How Would Jesus Blog” and Our Responsibility to Answer Our Critics

“How Would Jesus Blog” and Our Responsibility to Answer Our Critics

My friend Eric Chabot, Ratio Christi director at Ohio State University, emailed me this question about How Would Jesus Blog? It’s a good one, so I obtained permission from him to post it along with my answer. Eric’s Question: Shouldn’t We Answer Our Critics? So what are your thoughts on this: In his book Introducing Apologetics: Cultivating Christian Commitment, James Taylor lists three kinds of people who we will encounter when doing evangelism. If anything, if we do evangelism and encounter…

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Dripping Deep and Trivial

Dripping Deep and Trivial

The other day John Loftus wrote on Facebook, “Faith is an irrational leap over the probabilities based on at least one cognitive bias and buttressed by at least one logical fallacy.” I don’t respond to John very often anymore, but something about the context of this post piqued my interest; or rather, it was the lack of all context. Sure, I know John could probably show where he thinks he got that claim from. But here it was just sitting…

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