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Tag: Justice

John Loftus’s Bad Reasons for Not Going To Church, and a Few Good Ones For Going

John Loftus’s Bad Reasons for Not Going To Church, and a Few Good Ones For Going

John Loftus, the affable hat-wearing atheist who loves to poke quasi-informed fun at Christians, posted this on Facebook yesterday: Except for extremely rare circumstance I don’t go to church. For one thing, I don’t need to be reminded to be good. For another, I find a deity who commands people to worship him egocentric, regardless of whether he deserves it or not. For yet another reason, I can get more things done by actually doing something rather than by praying. Then…

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The Rush To Reject Reality

The Rush To Reject Reality

Otto Tellick wrote to me in a comment concerning my recent BreakPoint article, Your own black-and-white view of gender, like any strictly segregationist view of race, is not consistent with reality, and stands in direct opposition to a true sense of social justice. This is indeed a nuanced kind of issue, though not for me in the same way that it is for Otto. For me the question has to do with society’s rush to reject reality. In order to…

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Real vs. Counterfeit Compassion (Part 2)

Real vs. Counterfeit Compassion (Part 2)

Sam Harris thinks we’ll see how rational it is to be compassionate toward evildoers if we recognize that no one has free will. If criminals are not really to blame for their wrong, it makes no sense to hate them for it. But as I wrote in Part 1, this “compassion” comes at the price of denying all humanness; and with that eliminated, just what is it we’re being compassionate toward? Harris’s no-free-will dystopia is disturbing in other ways besides….

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Ten Turning Points: Again, Why the Cross?

Ten Turning Points: Again, Why the Cross?

From the series, Ten Turning Points That Make All the Difference When Jesus died on the cross he did it for joy and for love. We saw that last time in this series. That doesn’t tell us much, though, about what was actually helpful about his dying.. Earlier in this series (here and here) we looked at humanity’s fundamental problem, our separation from God due to disobedience. This is a spiritual separation, a lack of relationship between us and God,…

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A Secular Sort of Dominionism

A Secular Sort of Dominionism

A Liberal Idea of Civility A First Things: Evangel commenter who goes by “Remember Rollen” had this to say in the discussion on Hunter Baker’s article on dominionism: If a “gay rights” law touching basic matters of justice cannot be justified in terms we can reasonably expect others to accept, then we violate a liberal ideal of civility when we restrict the freedoms of others through that law. But I don’t quite see this with respect to [the overturning of]…

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As We Forgive, Part 3

As We Forgive, Part 3

Book Review For many readers, Rwanda in 1994 may seem like a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away. Genocide, thankfully, is probably very far removed from your experience, as it is from mine. What then do you and I do with a book like As We Forgive: Stories of Reconciliation From Rwanda? I can’t go into details here because of sensitivity toward a non-family member, but just last night an issue of deep betrayal and hurt arose…

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What Christ Does For Us, Part 3: The Extent of Brokenness

What Christ Does For Us, Part 3: The Extent of Brokenness

God created us for relationship with Him, and with genuine moral significance as part of our makeup. We turned away from Him and broke that relationship. Our connection to the true source of life and love was broken, and death and alienation entered our experience. This we learn from Genesis 1 through 3, as covered in the first two posts in this series (see the Series list below). The first chapters of Genesis illustrate God’s holiness and justice without actually…

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