Tom Gilson

Pastors, Teachers, Leaders: This Book is Lighting Up Lives for Christ!

[For those who’ve read Too Good to be False: Do you have your own story of how it’s drawn you closer to Christ? Would you like to share it with others here?]

It “totally shook me up,” writes Amber, a blogger. She’d fallen into spiritual apathy, she says, but Too Good to be False awakened her to see “how awe-inspiring and unbelievably wonderful my Savior is.”

She’s not alone. This book is lighting up lives for Christ. Almost unbelievably to me, most of the people reviewing the book have spoken of the new wonder they’ve seen in Jesus.

Even J. P. Moreland, Distinguished Professor at Biola University (and one of my intellectual heroes) wrote, “I have never approached the gospels in this way and, with Gilson’s guidance, I have come to love, respect, and worship Jesus with renewed vigor and insight.”

She’s not alone. This book is lighting up lives for Christ.

And it’s all because this book paints a fresh new picture of Jesus’ amazing greatness. That’s why I wrote it: I want everyone to discover in fresh, eye-opening, even surprising new ways, “the knowledge of the glory of the Lord” (Hab. 2:14).

That’s what all Christian leaders want, isn’t it? Not long ago a pastor friend told me in a moment of vulnerability, “It gets hard. I preach my heart out, and they just sit there.” I know he’s not the only one who’d say that.

I’m at risk of walking on something like holy ground here, but reader responses so far to Too Good to be False suggest that this book could make a difference. It could truly help your people light up with life in Christ.

Discovering Jesus’ Greatness All Over Again

I know this book is changing lives: It’s changed mine! After more than 40 years as a Christian, serving as a senior leader in two mission agencies, studying with some of the greatest teachers, I was still stunned by the discoveries I made in the course of researching and writing this book. Jesus is far, far greater than I knew.

James Robison, preacher, speaker, author, humanitarian and television host, wrote, “If you have never thought much about the impeccable character of Jesus or need a fresh a reminder, you will be impacted by what Gilson shares in detail.”

Jesus is far, far greater than I knew!

Pastor Gene Cornett, from the Richmond, Virginia area, said, “This book does something that seems rare for a book by a Christian apologist: It provokes worship. It moves us in the direction of not just right answers and right actions, but right affections. It provokes us to follow the leadership of the Holy Spirit to delight in the Lord Jesus himself!”

That’s what’s happened to me in discovering Jesus’ greatness all over again. Seeing more of the magnificence of his character, I can’t help but worship him, falling on my face and crying out, “O Lord Jesus, You are my God!”

It’s Not Supposed To Be a Secret

And I desperately want everyone to know how great our Lord is. While I was writing it I was using the working title, “Too Used to Jesus” — because I know easily how most of us can fall into taking him for granted.

In an early draft, I opened the book with this. It’s still true, even though I took a different direction with it in the final version:

I feel like I’ve been holding a secret — two secrets, actually. The first is the better one (the second isn’t bad, either). I’ve been following Jesus Christ almost 45 years, studying him, seeking to learn his ways. But in the past couple of years that I’ve discovered that he is way more extraordinary than I’d ever realized. He’s way better. He’s astonishing.

I use words like that frequently in this book. As a writer I know it’s important not to overuse words. I’ve done my best, I assure you. It’s not easy, though, for there are only so many ways to say Jesus is amazing.

Why would that seem such a secret, you ask? Don’t we know already? Don’t we know that he is God incarnate, the Second Person of the Trinity, the one who died and rose again for us? Isn’t that amazing enough right there?

And my answer is yes, of course. But it’s familiar; we’re used to it. We’ve heard the story so many times we’ve grown used to it. His story is ingrained in us — which is a good thing, certainly! Except for one thing: For many of us, the result has been that we’ve become used to Jesus himself. We’ve lost our sense of surprise at his greatness. We know the stories well enough. But what if there was more to them between the lines?

For You and Your Church, For Individuals and for Small Groups

So my question to pastors and other leaders is, Would you like your people to take Jesus less for granted? Would you like them, too, to be surprised at his greatness; overwhelmed, even?

That’s why I wrote this book. I can’t explain it all, especially how I was granted the privilege of writing it for others this way. I just know I want others to discover Jesus’ greatness as I am discovering it. And apparently this book is accomplishing that.

I’m especially eager, though, to hear what happens when small groups pick up the book and study it together. I’ll start my own first group in a few weeks, and I’ll use the same chapter discussion questions you can find at the end of the book.

For the Glory of the Lord

I urge you, then, to check out this book. Amazon has had trouble keeping up with demand, or maybe it’s our printer (I hear rumors of COVID slowing them down), but you know the principle: order it sooner and you’ll get your copy sooner. (Barnes & Noble may have more stock on hand than Amazon.)

Is this about selling books, you ask? You wouldn’t believe me if I said no, so I won’t try! Yes, I like the idea of selling books. But to the depths of my heart I am passionate about telling the glory of the Lord. That’s what this is mostly about.

So I hope you’ll get your copy. I think it will help you tell the glory of the Lord with your people.

Inside the Book

For unknown reasons, Amazon isn’t allowing a “look inside” this book yet. My publisher is working on solving that. In the meantime, here’s a list of chapter titles for you.

  1. (Introduction) Seeing Jesus Through New Eyes
  2. Jesus’ Astonishing Love
  3. Jesus’ Surpassing Brilliance
  4. Jesus’ Authority
  5. Jesus’ Paradoxical Leadership
  6. Jesus’ World-Changing Mission
  7. Jesus, the Man Who Was God
  8. Jesus, Friend

Interlude and Part One Conclusion: The Supremacy of Jesus

Part Two: Too Good To Be False

  1. The Skeptical Challenge
  2. The Impossible “Legend” of Jesus
  3. How Do You Invent the Story of a God-Man?
  4. Skeptical Objections

Part Three: Jesus, No Matter What

  1. How Jesus Became So Easy to Take for Granted
  2. Jesus Alone, Faith Alone
  3. Jesus, No Matter What
  • Epilogue for Pastors, Teachers, And Other Ministers
  • Study Guide

Image Credit(s): Ismael Paramo/Unsplash.

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"Engaging… exhilarating.… This might be the most surprising and refreshing book you’ll read this year!" — Lee Strobel

"Too Good To Be False is almost too good to be true!" — Josh McDowell

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