Browsed by
Month: March 2008

More Ironies of Easter

More Ironies of Easter

They thought they had Jesus figured out, and they also thought they had him under control. Not so: He [Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor] entered his headquarters again and said to Jesus, “Where are you from?” But Jesus gave him no answer. So Pilate said to him, “You will not speak to me? Do you not know that I have authority to release you and authority to crucify you?” Jesus answered him, “You would have no authority over me at…

Read More Read More

Easter Reprise

Easter Reprise

First posted on February 1, but made for Easter, for He is Risen! Jesus Christ lived on Earth and displayed a life of perfect love, trust, and worship. His example is incomparably great–and it’s unreachable. Part of the validation of the message of Christ is in its unique combination of reality and perfection in the character He displayed. The standard He set is strongly desirable–if being a person who lives for the sake of God and others, and in great…

Read More Read More

The Ironies of Easter

The Ironies of Easter

The religious and political leaders thought they had Jesus all figured out. I doubt there’s anything in history or literature to match the irony of that. They expected was the kind of thing they usually saw during a trial and execution: fear, self-protection, defensiveness; or possibly something like guilt, regret, or remorse. They thought they were in control. They thought it was about a political power struggle, in which Jesus was, to some of them, a nuisance, and to others…

Read More Read More

Good! Friday

Good! Friday

From a blog post a few weeks ago: Make no mistake, the cross of Jesus Christ is a drastic solution to a serious problem, and the problem is our fundamental distance, because of rebellion, from the God who created and loves us. He loves us enough that He was willing (”for the joy set before him” Christ did this) to sacrifice Himself to solve our problem. There is no other solution for such a deep difficulty as we are in….

Read More Read More

How Would We Recognize One True Religion?

How Would We Recognize One True Religion?

The responses to my question last week include the following. From SteveK: I’d say a religion that confirmed, or aligned with, what we are most striving for…. What has humanity been striving for throughout history? At the top of the list: love, truth, joy, contentment, justice, peace, understanding, relationship, significance, hope, etc. Leslie explained that followers’ devotion is not a true test of a religion, then added, Personally, the historical authenticity and reliability of the religion’s writings seems to me…

Read More Read More

Nonempirical Knowledge

Nonempirical Knowledge

There have been a bewildering 170 comments so far in response to a post published here a week ago. The bewilderment, for me, has been that much of the discussion has been a debate on the Law of Noncontradiction. It’s hard for me to see how that could be controversial–or how controversy is even possible if the LNC is not an agreed principle–but it has been. It started with the question whether there is such a thing as nonempirical knowledge….

Read More Read More

Will the Media and the APA Admit That Abortion Might Harm Women?

Will the Media and the APA Admit That Abortion Might Harm Women?

Abortion harms women. The Royal College of Psychiatrists is taking a very strong stand on this, saying it’s time to reverse positions and overturn policies on abortions. According to today’s [London] Times Online, Women may be at risk of mental health breakdowns if they have abortions, a medical royal college has warned. The Royal College of Psychiatrists says women should not be allowed to have an abortion until they are counselled on the possible risk to their mental health. This…

Read More Read More

%d bloggers like this: