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Try Your Hand At These Unanswered Math Questions

Posted on Aug 20, 2009 by Tom Gilson

These are actual questions that have been posted at WikiAnswers.com. To be fair, I have got to believe some of these were typos, but they live on regardless. At the time I wrote this post, none of these had been answered at WikiAnswers.

Whoever wrote the questions in this first grouping apparently knows how to operate a computer and navigate the Internet. But when it comes to math, these questions were …

Too Tough For Me!

What is 87 milion?

How high is 46 meters?

One lb equals how many lbs?

What is 50 plus 100?

How do you count from 1-20?

How long is 235 km?

How much is 330 million?

Find the product of 75 and 1?

How many inches does 60 inches equal?

How long is two miles?

What is the equivalent decimal for 3.71?

Whew! Those were hard! You’ll be glad to know I can provide answers to these:

Is your width always you shortest distance?

No, sad to say, my width is not as short a distance as it used to be.

Do you hold a tattoo gun at a 45 degree angle?

No, I don’t, and that’s my final answer.

In math what are the 4 multiples of 7?

The first three are 7, 14, 21, and the other one is 49.

What are the rules of multiplying powers?

You might want to consult Machiavelli on that one.

How do you get volume of water in cylinder?

Hold the cylinder under the faucet, turn on the water …

What is 50 grams of chocolate equal to?

About 34 1/2 standard-size Hershey’s Special Dark bars.

How many m are in a m?

I don’t actually know the answer to this one but I think it’s probably related to the previous question.

Some questions have a definite theological connection:

Right angel is a?

See Isaiah 6:2-6 for a good example.

Who was the founder of natural number?

God.

If I have three numbers that are 97 83 and 89 which one is prime?

Why does this remind me of trying to explain the Trinity?

Wouldn’t you love to know the answer to these?

Which number is always a winning number?

What will happen 4000 years from now?

Some questions are just imponderable.

Why are numbers used in Math?

What is 70?

What has two million parts in it?

How much wood does a wood-chuck chuck?

Whose difference is 152?

What is the value of boldfaced digit 189612357?

Will you be my square root of three?

The problem with these is not “Too Much Information”

If and x equals -12 find y?

What is the sum of 14?

How many minutes are there in 67?

Where are the first 2?

Explain how you would tell another student how to find the value of x?

Math has a history

What metric system did spartans use?

How many metric systems did they have to choose from?

What year was math first discovered?

Definition Daffiness

What is difference detween foot and feet?

Is 2 a standard notation in math?

How much larger is a kilogram than a pound?

I’ll give points to the first commenter who knows why I included this question in this category. I’ll give even more points to the first commenter who knows why there are at least two reasons to include this question in this category. (The answers I’m thinking of have nothing to do with monetary systems.) Points are redeemable for free visits to this website at your discretion (you must provide your own access to the Internet, however).

Distance, area, volume: who cares?

Convert 110 meters to cubic meters?

How do you convert 31 inches wide into cubic feet?

How many liters in 1 cm?

1 feet is equal to how many square feet?

Geometry Gems

How many rectangles have a perimeter of 14 and 16 and 18 and 24?

A rhombus with no right angles is what kind of square?

What is formed by 2 or more figures?

Do you add volume?

Yes, unfortunately I do. See my answer above to “Is your width always you shortest distance?”

What is the area of Kentucky in math?

What is the name of a 3 sided solid?

Are all of those sides flat planes?

One degree is equal how many inches?

And finally, my three favorites:

What is the answer to question 322?

You gotta love the direct approach there.

Why was the maths book worried?

See above.

How do you find mathematics in your studies?

Do not see above.

9 Responses to “ Try Your Hand At These Unanswered Math Questions ”

  1. Charlie says:

    Luke’s link shows that the official kilogram, the world standard, might be getting less massive.
    That would explain why it always takes an increasing number of them to describe my weight.

  2. Dave says:

    From the kilogram link…

    Scientists have already used constants to redefine other units of measurement, like the meter. Originally the meter was equal to the length of a piece of metal kept alongside the kilogram, but in 1983 it was redefined as the distance light travels in a vacuum over 299,792,458ths of a second. Because the speed of light is constant, this new definition means that the meter will never change.

    From New Scientist

    The speed of light, one of the most sacrosanct of the universal physical constants, may have been lower as recently as two billion years ago – and not in some far corner of the universe, but right here on Earth.

    The controversial finding is turning up the heat on an already simmering debate, especially since it is based on re-analysis of old data that has long been used to argue for exactly the opposite: the constancy of the speed of light and other constants.

    Ooops.

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn6092-speed-of-light-may-have-changed-recently.html

  3. Kim J. says:

    My students often had interesting ideas about what mathematicians do. My favorite was the one who thought I came up with bigger and bigger numbers.

  4. SteveK says:

    I can’t answer them all, but these were no problem for me.

    How high is 46 meters?
    It’s over my head.

    One lb equals how many lbs?
    Let’s see: lbs = lb(a + b + c + d….r)

    How do you count from 1-20?
    You count by thirds, so the answer is 3.

    How much is 330 million?
    About 2 miles

    What is the equivalent decimal for 3.71?
    .371^10(1)

  5. Charlie says:

    What is the equivalent decimal for 3.71?

    Holopupenko might note that 3.71 is actually an unusually high value for 3.0

  6. Tom Gilson says:

    That’s right. It’s been my understanding that 3=3.5 for high values of 3, but 3.71 is actually quite high.

  7. Charlie says:

    Almost unheard of.

  8. Lisa says:

    Also, 2+2=5. but only for high values of 2. It may even be 2.23 and 2.77.

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